Sample Arterial Images from Euthanized Rabbit

Dr. Luis Savastano, University of Michigan provides images obtained from a VerAvanti Research Imaging System.

Images were obtained from an euthanized rabbit.

Looking at the inside of the catheter.

Looking at the inside of the catheter.

Inside the artery (away from thrombus)

Inside the artery (away from thrombus)

Inside the artery (close up of thrombus)

Inside the artery (close up of thrombus)

Bifurcation after removing the thrombus.

Bifurcation after removing the thrombus.

Sample Arterial Images from Post Mortem Human

Dr. Luis Savastano, University of Michigan provides images obtained from a VerAvanti Research Imaging System.

Images were obtained from post mortem human arteries.

Healthy Endovascular Surface

Healthy Endovascular Surface

Uncomplicated Artheroma at the Carotid Bifurcation

Uncomplicated Artheroma at the Carotid Bifurcation

Nature, Biomedical Engineering (volume 1, article 0023)

Nature, Biomedical Engineering (volume 1, article 0023)

Multimodal laser-based angioscopy for structural, chemical and biological imaging of atherosclerosis

Multimodal SFE video acquisition of post-mortem arteries. Endoluminal endoscopic videos (Supplementary Videos 1,2,3,4,5) were obtained by navigating the SFE probe into the common carotid artery (CCA) toward the CB and then into the first 2 cm of the ICA and external carotid artery (ECA).

Increased Accuracy of Atherosclerosis Detection Using Scanning Fiber Endoscope

Increased Accuracy of Atherosclerosis Detection Using Scanning Fiber Endoscope

Researchers from the University of Michigan used a unique application of a medical camera to view the carotid artery to assess the risk of atherosclerosis. According to researchers at the University of Michigan School of Medicine used a scanning fiber endoscope, or SFE, to acquire high-quality images of potential atherosclerosis regions of the carotid artery that can be missed by conventional radiological techniques. "The camera actually goes inside the vessels," Dr. Luis Savastano is a Michigan Medicine resident neurosurgeon and first author of the study. He said in a press release, "We can see with very high resolution the surface of the vessels and any lesions, such as a ruptured plaque, that could cause a stroke. This technology may even be able to show which silent, but at-risk, plaques may cause a cardiovascular event in the future."